After Haiti was devastated by an earthquake in 2010, the world responded quickly to help the country rebuild. But despite the billions in relief funds, attention has waned.  Lost in the platitudes of governments and organizations were the rise of tent communities of displaced people, such as Jerusalem.  Intended to be a temporary solution, the government declared it permanent in 2013.

Today, over 100,000 people reside in Jerusalem, committed to live in a desert that is now their home.  There are churches, small schools and thousands of simple homes, but the lack of resources and infrastructure is still apparent.  Jobs are rare, clean water is sparse, and many people go days without food.  Locals often refer to Jerusalem as Haiti's "ghetto".

"Permanently Displaced" follows the evolution of Jerusalem as residents work to build a self-sustaining community from nothing.  It begs the question, what is a community?  What does it mean to be settled?

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A man stands in front of his shop. Most able-bodied men rely on contract work in construction or carpentry in Jerusalem.  According to the CIA Factbook, more than two-thirds of the labor force in Haiti doesn't have formal jobs.

A man stands in front of his shop. Most able-bodied men rely on contract work in construction or carpentry in Jerusalem.  According to the CIA Factbook, more than two-thirds of the labor force in Haiti doesn't have formal jobs.

Workers build the foundation of a home.  Often, homes aren't finished, leaving exposed reinforcing bars or open roofs, in order to avoid paying taxes.

Workers build the foundation of a home.  Often, homes aren't finished, leaving exposed reinforcing bars or open roofs, in order to avoid paying taxes.

In order to make relocation to Jerusalem sound appealing, the government promised individuals ownership of whatever land they settle.  However, often, the arrangements are informal.

In order to make relocation to Jerusalem sound appealing, the government promised individuals ownership of whatever land they settle.  However, often, the arrangements are informal.

A boy and his sister look out from their home made of tin and sheets.

A boy and his sister look out from their home made of tin and sheets.

The kids in Le Fleur's Orphanage range from newborns to 18 years old. Sometimes they're dropped off because their parents simply can't take are of them, and they'll return to their families when they're older. Sometimes, however, they are left for good.

The kids in Le Fleur's Orphanage range from newborns to 18 years old. Sometimes they're dropped off because their parents simply can't take are of them, and they'll return to their families when they're older. Sometimes, however, they are left for good.

One of the boys at Le Fleur's Orphanage holds one of his few possessions.

One of the boys at Le Fleur's Orphanage holds one of his few possessions.

A girl plays jump rope in Le Fleur's Orphanage. Madame Le Fleur came to Jerusalem immediately after the earthquake with 30 kids. In the beginning, they lived under poorly constructed tents with little refuge from the elements. Now, thanks to donations from local churches and international relief funds, they live in a gated compound.

A girl plays jump rope in Le Fleur's Orphanage. Madame Le Fleur came to Jerusalem immediately after the earthquake with 30 kids. In the beginning, they lived under poorly constructed tents with little refuge from the elements. Now, thanks to donations from local churches and international relief funds, they live in a gated compound.

A boy plays soccer one on of the many dirt roads that winds through Jerusalem.

A boy plays soccer one on of the many dirt roads that winds through Jerusalem.

A goat stares out from its perch.  Many in Jerusalem struggle to afford food and will go days without a meal.

A goat stares out from its perch.  Many in Jerusalem struggle to afford food and will go days without a meal.

A woman takes supplies back to her home.  Locals will walk miles in the desert heat and wait in long lines for clean water and food sources.

A woman takes supplies back to her home.  Locals will walk miles in the desert heat and wait in long lines for clean water and food sources.

Locals gather around a well in the hot sun with jugs and canisters in the hopes of getting clean water. It was merely a pump test, but word that water might be available had spread quickly.

Locals gather around a well in the hot sun with jugs and canisters in the hopes of getting clean water. It was merely a pump test, but word that water might be available had spread quickly.

Men test the water of a new well, which promises clean water. The hope is that once the well is up and running, the sale of the water will help the locals earn a more sustainable living.

Men test the water of a new well, which promises clean water. The hope is that once the well is up and running, the sale of the water will help the locals earn a more sustainable living.

A girl eats beside her home, which is surrounded by barbed wire. Jerusalem is loosely governed by dozens of informal subcommittees, which work to keep the community peaceful and quiet, but it's common for homes to have gates or barbed wire nonetheless.

A girl eats beside her home, which is surrounded by barbed wire. Jerusalem is loosely governed by dozens of informal subcommittees, which work to keep the community peaceful and quiet, but it's common for homes to have gates or barbed wire nonetheless.

A large, well-constructed church sits near the main road.

A large, well-constructed church sits near the main road.

Boys gather to watch TV in one of the few barbershops. It also serves as a charge station where people can pay to charge their phone.

Boys gather to watch TV in one of the few barbershops. It also serves as a charge station where people can pay to charge their phone.

A boy hangs near one of the private schools while class takes place. He can't afford to attend.

A boy hangs near one of the private schools while class takes place. He can't afford to attend.